Exactly how much do you unlock when you jailbreak your iOS device?

Most apps collect detailed information about where you go and and what you do with your device

Although we offer our service across multiple devices and browser platforms, it seems that we get quite a few emails from people who complain about how their iOS devices have had their security compromised.

After getting enough emails on the issue, we realized that there was a pretty common trend: the people who were worried about having their device compromised were the people who also unlocked (“jailbroke”) their phones.

Why would jailbreaking your phone put you at greater risk?

Without getting too technical, the process of “jailbreaking” is essentially  hacking your own device to make it more like a computer: you modify certain elements of the (Apple) operating system so that you can do more things with your phone (from things as small as changing the font color throughout the entire device, to installing programs not in the AppStore), but, in doing so, you also open up your device to hackers.

Even if you don’t get outright hacked on a jailbroken device, though, there are other security issues that are important to consider. Although the report focuses on Android apps, a McAfee research study published earlier this year indicated that privacy-invading apps are becoming increasingly common, with

35% of the most aggressive [privacy] offenders contain[ing] malware, including Trojans that can download other software or perform unwanted activities, and suspicious programs, such as spyware.

 

Most apps collect detailed information about where you go and and what you do with your device
image credit: source

 

Basically, once you jailbreak your phone, you open up your phone at the bare minimum to applications that can data mine your more personal or sensitive device data that they might not otherwise be able to get.

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